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           KENTUCKY LAWN & GARDEN TIPS

beaniebob.gif (6029 bytes)Kentucky Bob Says :   Time to apply TEAM to control crabgrass in established lawns.  40# bags usually covers 1/2 acre..........Apply fertilizer and lime now through march to you lawn.......prune apple trees now.....Do not trim early Spring flowering shrubs (they have already formed their blooms)

 

Don't wait too late till after you start to see crabgrass, then it's too late for pre emergence control

Have you ordered plants from mail order and received bare root with no soil ?  These are O. K. as long as they are dormant.  Plant right away if possible. Soak roots for 24 hours in water just before planting.  If you can not plant right away be sure to heal them into the soil until you can.

  A great way to improve 90% of all our lawns is to increase the PH by liming with pelleted lime at the rate of two 40# bags per 1000 square feet.      

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Having trouble with getting grass under your trees? Most of the time tree roots cause poor stands of grass. The tree roots absorb most of the moisture and plant food needed by the grass to grow. Ivy or rock beds around the base of large trees can be very attractive and long lasting.

ANNUALS

ABOUT ANNUAL FLOWERS

WHAT IS AN ANNUAL?
An annual plant completes its life cycle in just one season, from seed to flower to producing seeds, all before frost kills the plant. Most annuals are tender (killed by frost) but there are some which are fairly hardy and will take low temperatures late into the fall. Annuals bloom quickly from seed (that's their schedule) and most can be planted directly outdoors. 

HOW TO USE ANNUALS IN YOUR GARDEN:
Plant in large groups, or in masses, or in rows -- whatever effect you like. Some annuals are pretty when used as a low hedge or border around other plants. Annual flowers also are wonderful companions to perennial plants, especially perennial gardens which have been recently planted and may not bloom the same season. Plant around mailboxes, in an old tire, or in a wheelbarrow. Annuals are wonderful in large containers, too, and in hanging baskets. Allow space for plants to grow (if too crowded, they canít bloom well).

CAN I PLANT ANYTHING ELSE WITH MY ANNUALS?
YES! Combine with spring-flowering bulbs, summer flowering bulbs, perennial plants, blooming shrubs. They're also great combined with a lot of other annual flowers.

PLANT COMBINATIONS TO TRY (ANNUALS IN RED)
  1. Daylilies and Peonies with Daffodils, Dahlias and Marigolds, Calendula and Nasturtiums
  2. Hosta and Bleeding Heart with Tuberous Begonias and Impatiens, Coleus and Pansy
  3. Echinacea and Liatris with Lilies and Vinca, Scabiosa and Cornflowers
  4. Poppies and Daylilies with Tulips, Lilies and Ageratum, Lavatera and Larkspur
  5. Rudbeckia and Hollyhocks with Cannas, Gladiolus and Zinnias, Verbena and Snapdragons.
  6. Use your imagination -- Anything goes!

HOW TO GROW ANNUALS

PLAN YOUR GARDEN:
S
ketch the area on graph paper. Put groups of similar plants together for pleasing color effect from a distance. Allow space (one to one-half times plant height) for plants to grow and spread.

EVALUEATE AND PREPARE SOIL:
Select an area that's well-drained (no puddles after rain). Improve soil by adding plenty of organic material before establishing your garden, and do so every year thereafter. Loosen soil by tilling or digging to a depth of 6-12 inches. Turn over well, forking in the organic material. If a soil test indicates, spread a balanced fertilizer over the area, and work in. Smooth the soil surface and mark the locations for planting. If starting a new garden in spring, wait until your soil has passed the "clump" test. A palm-full of soil should stick together when squeezed, then break apart into medium-sized particles. At this point, itís safe to work soil.

PLANTING:
Scatter seed in bands, groups or rows, according to packet instructions. When seedlings have several pairs of leaves, thin then out and mulch around each plant (a 2-3 inch layer).

WATERING:
Water well daily, so seedlings will emerge quickly and begin to bloom. After plants are established, water weekly.

Other than removing faded flower heads and regular watering, annuals are pretty carefree. For early-flowering annuals, cut plants back when flowers have stopped appearing. This will encourage new flowering. If you've planted annuals for cutting, be sure to cut frequently because this will encourage more flowers for future bouquets. Enjoy!

FAVORITE ANNUAL FLOWERS FROM SEED INCLUDE:
African daisy, ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, aster, baby's breath, bachelor button, balsam, basil, calendula, California poppy, candytuft, cardinal climber, catmint, cleome, celosia, cockscomb, coleus, dianthus, four o'clock, geranium, globe amaranth, gourds, ornamental grass, hyacinth bean, impatiens, flowering kale, larkspur, lobelia, marigold, melampodium, moonflower, morning glory, moss rose, nasturtium, nicotiana, nigella, pansy, petunia, phlox, pincushion flower, rudbeckia, salvia, scarlet runner bean, Shirley poppy, snapgragon, statice, strawflower, sunflower, Texas bluebonnet, tithonia, verbena, vinca and zinnia.

POSSIBLE PROBLEMS:

Pull weeds when theyíre small. Deadhead (pick off faded flowers) daily. The more you do this, the better the plants will bloom. Pick off any dead or sick-looking leaves from plant or ground around plant. Donít add diseased or insect-infested stems to your compost (they may live over winter). Look for insects, and hand-pick them. A hard spray from the hose will help wash off many pests. Beneficial insects (ladybugs) and birds can help eat insect pests.
COMMON INSECTS

  • Aphids Small, soft-bodied, translucent insects, color green, red, brown or black, which suck plant juices. Found on shoots, under leaves and on flower buds. Can stunt or deform leaves or flowers. Sticky residue ("honeydew") usually present, which attracts ants. Control: ladybugs, strong spray from hose, insecticidal soap.
  • Beetles Adults chew leaves, flowers and stems; larvae (grubs) chew roots. Control: Pick beetles off and knock into a can of kerosene and water.
  • Caterpillars Larvae of moths and butterflies feed on leaves, buds and flowers, mostly in spring. Buds are chewed, leaves may be rolled up around the worm. Control: Remove affected buds and leaves.
  • Mites Tiny colonies of red or brown spiders in webs under leaves; suck plant juices and cause leaves to turn stippled, grayish, then fall. Control: Clean up plant debris around plants in spring. Wash off with a spray from the hose; do this daily and try to get the underside of the leaves. Can spray with insecticidal soap or miticide.
  • Whiteflies Scale-like, flat, oval pale green or brown in nymph stage, white winged adults which fly up in a cloud the plant is disturbed. Mottled leaves, turn yellow and die. Control: Difficult.

  • COMMON DISEASES
  • Fungus (Powdery Mildew) White, powdery patches on leaves, shoots, buds; stunted foliage or distorted shoots. Spread by wind, splashing water, plant debris. Control: Remove affected plant parts, dispose.
  • Fungus Diseases (Rust) Yellow dots on tops, rusty patches underneath leaves. Spread by wind, splashing water, plant debris from previous season. Control: Remove affected plant parts, dispose.
  • Virus Diseases (Mosaic, Aster Yellows) Mottled or mosaic patterns on leaves; stunted or distorted growth. Control: Spread by aphids or leafhoppers. Remove and dispose of affected plants. No real cure. Rotate your flowers around in different places each year.

PERENNIALS

ABOUT PERENNIAL FLOWERS

WHAT IS A PERENNIAL?
A perennial plant is hardy (lives over the winter in most areas of the country). Most take two years until they are old enough to bloom. Plants may live for several, or many, years. Perennial vegetables such as asparagus and rhubarb may take several years until they are old enough to harvest. A biennial takes 2 years to mature and bloom. After blooming, it dies. To have bloom year after year with biennial flowers, plant seed EVERY year. Click here for Zone Map.
HOW TO USE PERENNIALS IN YOUR GARDEN:
Plant in clumps of at least 3 plants together. Repeat elsewhere in the garden (provides more blooms and pleasing repetition of shape and color). Allow space for plants to grow (if too crowded, canít bloom well)

COMBINING OTHER PLANTS WITH PERENNIALS:
Combine perennial flowering plants, which normally have a limited blooming period, with spring-flowering bulbs, summer flowering bulbs, and annual flowering plants. Plan for flowers which bloom at different times, from spring to fall.

PLANT COMBINATIONS TO TRY FOR EXTENDED BLOOM TIME (perennials in red):
  1. Delphinium and Lupine with Lunaria, Forget Me Not, Ageratum, Lobelia and Sweet Alyssum
  2. Echinacea and Liatris with Lilies and Vinca, Scabiosa and Cornflowers
  3. Black Eyed Susan, Butterfly Weed and Blanketflower with Marigolds, Celosia and Zinnias
  4. Rudbeckia and Hollyhocks with Cannas, Gladiolus and Zinnias, Verbena and Snapdragons.
  5. Use your imagination -- Anything goes!

FAVORITE PERENNIAL & BIENNIAL (in red below) FLOWERS FROM SEED INCLUDE:
Achillea, Alyssum, Anchusa, Asclepias, Aster, Baby's Breath, Balloon Flower, Bellflower, Black Eyed Susan, Blanketflower, Cactus, Carnation, Cerastium, Columbine, Coreopsis, Cupid's Dart, Dahlia, Daisy Fleabane, Dame's Rocket, Delphinium, Echinacea, English Daisy, English Wallflower, Evening Primrose, Forget-me-not, Foxglove, Geum, Fountain grass, Heliopsis, Hollyhock, Iceland Poppy, Jacob's Ladder, Jupiter's Beard, Lavender, Liatris, Linum, Lunaria, Lupine, Maltese Cross, Oriental Poppy, Painted Daisy, Persian Cornflower, Red Hot Poker, Rock Cress, Rock Soapwort, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Shasta Daisy, Sweet William, Tansy, Veronica and Viola.

HOW TO GROW PERENNIALS

PLAN YOUR GARDEN:
Sketch the area on graph paper. Put similar plants together in clumps of at least 3. Allow space (one to one-half times plant height.

Evaluate and Prepare Soil:
Select an area that's well-drained (no puddles after rain). Improve soil by adding plenty of organic material before establishing your garden, and do so every year thereafter. Loosen soil by tilling or digging to a depth of 6-12 inches. Turn over well, forking in the organic material. If a soil test indicates, spread a balanced fertilizer over the area, and work in. Smooth the soil surface and mark the locations for planting. If starting a new garden in spring, wait until your soil has passed the "clump" test. A palm-full of soil should stick together when squeezed, then break apart into medium-sized particles. At this point, itís safe to work soil.

PLANTING:
Dig a large hole for each plant. Set dormant perennial plants at the level indicated on the plant label. If it says "1 inch deep", that means the crown of plants (top or growing point) should be 1" below the soil surface. Roots should be placed deeper, pointing downward or sideways. Other plants should be set in ground at the same level they were in pot. Mulch around each plant (a 2-3 inch layer).

WATERING:
Water each plant well during and right after planting. Each plant should be given about a gallon of water, slowly, so it can soak in around the roots.

PERENNIAL PLANT CARE:
Divide Perennial plants grow larger each year, by spreading outwards and making a larger clump, competing for space and nutrients. The inner part of the plant tends to die out. Divide clumps after your 3 or 4 years. Late Fall Clean Up Remove dead leaves from around plants. When they have died back, trim off to about 3" above ground. When soil freezes solid, mulch to prevent frost heaving which can damage plant roots.

HOW TO GROW SPECIFIC PERENNIAL PLANTS:

  • Bearded Iris This long-lived perennial is also called German Iris or Flags. Grow in full sun. Plant at soil level, about 24 in. apart. Usually blooms first year after planting. Plants bloom in late spring. Use balanced fertilizer after bloom. Sword-like foliage is attractive spring and fall. Clumps get bigger each year. Easy to grow. Divide clumps every three or four years and replant. Sometimes may show silvered, streaky foliage (could be infested with thrips).
  • Oriental Poppies A long-lived perennial. Grow in full sun. Plant 5 in. deep, about 18 in. apart. Once planted, leave undisturbed. May not bloom for several years after planting. Hairy, toothed leaves appear in late fall, live over into spring. Plants bloom in late spring. Use balanced fertilizer after bloom. Foliage dies down and nothing is seen until foliage begins to grow again in late fall. Clumps get bigger each year. Fine cut flower; singe the cut ends with a flame for longest-lasting flowers. No particular growing problems.
  • Peonies A long-lived perennial. Grow in full sun. Planting too deeply is a common mistake. Plant at soil surface or just below. Once planted, leave undisturbed. May not bloom for several years after planting. Staking plants before they bloom is a good idea because flower heads are heavy. Plants bloom in late spring. Use balanced fertilizer after bloom. Foliage is very attractive and resembles a shrub from spring until late fall. Clumps get bigger each year. Fine cut flower -- sweetly fragrant. No particular growing problems.

POSSIBLE PROBLEMS

PREVENT PROBLEMS:
Pull weeds when theyíre small. Pick off any dead or sick-looking leaves or flowers from plant or ground around plant. Donít add diseased or insect-infested stems to your compost (they may live over winter). Look for insects, and hand-pick them. A hard spray from the hose will help wash off many pests. Beneficial insects (ladybugs) and birds can help eat insect pests.

COMMON INSECTS

  • APHIDS Small, soft-bodied, translucent insects, color green, red, brown or black, which suck plant juices. Found on shoots, under leaves and on flower buds. Can stunt or deform leaves or flowers. Sticky residue ("honeydew") usually present, which attracts ants. Control: ladybugs, strong spray from hose, insecticidal soap; or contact spray.
  • BEETLES Adults chew leaves, flowers and stems; larvae (grubs) chew roots. Control: Pick beetles off and knock into a can of kerosene and water, or spray with appropriate chemical.
  • CATERPILLARS Larvae of moths and butterflies feed on leaves, buds and flowers, mostly in spring. Buds are chewed, leaves may be rolled up around the worm. Control: Remove affected buds and leaves; or use contact spray.
  • MITES Tiny colonies of red or brown spiders in webs under leaves; suck plant juices and cause leaves to turn stippled, grayish, then fall. Control: Clean up plant debris around plants in spring. Can spray with insecticidal soap or miticide.
  • THRIPS Tiny brown-yellow winged insets cause flecked or silver-white stippling, streak on leaves and flowers. Control: Cut off and dispose of faded flowers. Can spray with appropriate chemical.
  • WHITEFLIES Scale-like, flat, oval pale green or brown in nymph stage, white winged adults which fly up in a cloud the plant is disturbed. Mottled leaves, turn yellow and die. Control: Difficult. Spray with appropriate chemical.

COMMON DISEASES

  • BOTRYTIS BLIGHT (Gray Mold) Grayish-brown fuzzy mold found on weak foliage or stems and on flowers which are fading. Control: Pick off affected parts, dispose of but donít compost; or spray with fungicide.
  • FUNGUS (Powdery Mildew) White, powdery patches on leaves, shoots, buds; stunted foliage or distorted shoots. Spread by wind, splashing water, plant debris. Control: Remove affected plant parts, dispose. Can spray with fungicide.
  • FUNGUS DISEASES (Rust) Yellow dots on tops, rusty patches underneath leaves. Spread by wind, splashing water, plant debris from previous season. Control: Remove affected plant parts, dispose. Can spray with fungicide.
  • VIRUS DISEASES (Mosaic, Aster Yellows) Mottled or mosaic patterns on leaves; stunted or distorted growth. Control: Spread by aphids or leafhoppers. Remove and dispose of affected plants. No real cure.

HERBS

ABOUT HERBS

GROWING HERBS IN A KITCHEN GARDEN:
If you love to cook, you need a kitchen garden with lots of fresh herbs to pick! Have one this summer, situated in a handy place not far from the stove. Nothing beats the flavor of fresh herbs!

Gardens of edible plants were planted and maintained in the earliest days of America. Thomas Jeffersonís gardens at Monticello are notable both for their design and their variety of vegetables and herbs. These types of gardens are often called "kitchen gardens" because of their convenient placement near the Colonial kitchen, which was usually in a separate small outbuilding (in case of a fire).

Your cooking garden, to start with, could contain a few basic herbs and salad greens. One easy way to create such a garden is to build a small raised square, using pressure-treated landscaping ties or the new recycled plastic ties. If you have an old sandbox, use that! Or make a freeform or rectangular garden. Draw the shape on paper, and make a list of what youíd like to grow.

You donít need a lot of herb plants for savory cooking additions -- just a sprig or two of fresh herbs lend a piquant flavor to your recipes. One to three plants of each will be plenty for a small family. If you like, include some bunching onions and lettuce in your Cooking Garden. All are easily grown from seeds! To plant, follow the easy directions provided on the seed packets.


CAN I GROW HERBS INDOORS IN WINTER?
Sure -- any time of year! We suggest especially parsley, chives, basil, sage, oregano and thyme, because the plants stay small. Plant seeds in 4 to 6 inch pots filled with growing medium, and place in a sunny window. Clip off small sprigs as needed. Plants will thrive for a year or more indoors; then replant. You can also grow herbs indoors under fluorescent lights. Herb plants MUST have bright light in order to produce flavorful sprigs.

IS SUMMER TOO LATE TO START AN HERB GARDEN?
No. Annual herbs such as basil and dill grow quickly in warm summer weather. You can also start any perennial herbs in summer, and youíll still be able to harvest some this year. The next year, the plants will have grown into large clumps for harvesting from spring onwards. May through July is fine for planting annual herbs; June through August is fine for planting perennial herbs.

USING HERBS

TO DRY HERBS:
Cut young stems and leaves early in the day. Harvest before plants begin to flower. Bunch loosely and hang upside down in warm, airy place for 2-3 weeks, or spread small pieces on dehydrator tray and allow to dry completely.

TO DRY HERB SEEDS (Caraway, Dill):
Cut heads after flower heads have passed their prime (seeds are then developing). Catch seed heads in a paper bag. Shake bag to separate seeds from chaff.

TO STORE DRIED HERBS AND SEEDS:
Put in airtight jars. Keep out of sunlight. Use as desired.

TO FREEZE HERBS:
Place small, clean, dry pieces on cookie sheet. Freeze several hours. Place in freezer bags. Flavors keep for several months. Use as needed.

Copyright © 2004 Ferry-Morseģ Seed Company
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